Category Archives: audio

Aymara and the Ants

Earlier this year, when I was in Argentina, I began covering the #NiUnaMenos, Not One Fewer, movement. The movement began in 2015 when a young woman was found murdered and tens of thousands of people around the country mobilized to city squares to call for an end to femicide and gender-based violence. The BBC World Service accepted my pitch to produce a radio documentary about the organizing taking place to transform an unequal economic system that devalues women’s labor. The result featured Aymara Val, an activist in the Province of Buenos Aires with La Dignidad, an Argentine social movement. It aired on October 4th.

Aymara Val speaks to the press during a protest in front of the Lomas de Zamora City Hall in June 2017.

Pizza on the farm

NPR’s Morning Edition carried my story about Kat Becker and Tony Schultz’s Stoney Acres farm in Athens, WI yesterday. They have been making pizza with ingredients entirely from their organic farm since 2012. In addition to providing an income stream to the farm, the Friday-night pizza events are also offering residents a space to connect and get to know each other.

Riley Schultz helps the pigs cool off on a hot July evening at Stoney Acres farm.
Riley Schultz helps the pigs cool off on a hot July evening at Stoney Acres farm.

Valeria Maria de Alcântará, marisqueira

Roughly 5000 women participate in Pernambuco’s “straw hat” community education course for fisher women. Unlike their male counterparts, who generally use boats to fish off-shore, the women fisher folk are marisqueiras, shellfish women. They collect mollusks, sand crabs, brown crabs and other shellfish from the tidal mangrove swamps that hug the state’s coast. They do the work barefoot since they can since up to their mid-calves in the muddy terrain. At times, the women will be waist deep in water or higher as they pry mussels from tree branches or coax small crabs out from their shelter among the mangrove trees. Marisqueiras subsist on what they catch, which generally supplements the income the men in the household earn on the water or through other work.

But the marisqueiras say that the conditions in the mangrove swamps has deteriorated dramatically over the past several years. The decline corresponds to expansions at the Suape Port and Industrial Complex which houses two shipbuilding firms, a coca-cola bottling plant, and various chemical companies, among other enterprises.

The complex is located roughly 2 hours south of the state capital, Recife, on a coast known for its beautiful beaches. For some, the expansion has led to job opportunities in the port complex, which contributes roughly 10% of the state’s revenues. For Brazil as a whole, the new oil refinery offers a way to process some of the country’s oil wealth and avoid paying a premium for refined products it has to import. For many others in the area, the expansion disrupted lives and livelihoods by displacing people from their homes and crippling damage to the mangrove swamps’ ecosystem.

I owe tremendous thanks to Valeria Maria de Alcântará, who is featured in this slideshow, as well as to Melé Dornelas of the Comité Pastoral da Pesca, which organizes subsistence fisherfolk like Ms. de Alcântará. Many others deserve recognition for their help:  Helenilda Cavalcanti of the Fundaçao Joaquim Nabuco and Nivete Azevedo of the Centro das Mulheres do Cabo.

“Rolezinhos” Fill Brazilian Malls — And Reveal Racial and Class Tensions

Janaína Oliveira, a racial justice activist in Recife, Brazil, tells onlookers at the Rio Mar shopping mall that this "rolezinho" aims to ensure that malls are accessible to people of color.
Janaína Oliveira, a racial justice activist in Recife, Brazil, tells onlookers at the Rio Mar shopping mall that this “rolezinho” aims to ensure that malls are accessible to people of color.

In January, Brazil was filled with news about “rolezinhos,” little outings. Rolezinhos are get-togethers organized on facebook. Primarily, they have offered way for low-income youth, who are also often people of color, to hang out, flirt, and shop in malls. But in early December roughly 6,000 youth came out to a rolezinho in São Paulo, and the event was accompanied by rumors of theft and mass muggings, although only three people were reportedly arrested. This blog post by Rio Gringa, offers an excellent review of the course of events and the debates around the gatherings. Repression by mall administrators and police, including pre-emptive arrests, led Amnesty International to call the response to the rolezinhos discriminatory and racist. Solidarity rolezinhos were planned and held in different parts of Brazil, including Recife. Public Radio International´s The World gave me an opportunity to cover this phenomenon for them, and to talk about the class and racial tensions that the rolezinhos are revealing as Brazil heads into the final months of preparing to host the World Cup.

Cockroaches: They’re at London’s Science Museum

Roaches learn about human eating habits from Professor John Cockroach, a.k.a. Michael Bendib, center.
Roaches learn about human eating habits from Professor John Cockroach, a.k.a. Michael Bendib, center.

On a visit to London this summer, a buddy of mine, Matt Davis, mentioned that London’s Science Museum has a cockroach tour. That is, one can go to the museum and experience something similar to Gregor Samsa’s transformation into a bug by donning a cockroach costume. DW was planning a special edition focusing on climate change education, and they thought the story engaging enough to publish. You can listen to the audio version or read the text one.