Tag Archives: Recife

Living in Paradise: a multi-media documentary on Pernambuco’s women fisher folk

Vania Maria de Alcàntara looks up at a mangrove tree as she starts a shellfishing expedition.
Vania Maria de Alcàntara looks up at a mangrove tree as she starts a shellfishing expedition.

I owe a debt of thanks to Allison Mills who suggested I look into the Creativist (now Atavist) platform for this project. Below is a link to the project I put together after my eight months in Brazil exploring the issues affecting women, especially women fisher folk, south of Recife near the Suape Port and Industrial Complex. The idea was to explore the impact that an expanding port and industrial complex (complete with a brand new Petrobras refinery) was having on the women and the environment that sustains their livelihoods. There is much more to say about this and the overall impact, but the link below will take you to the multi-media piece that I have finally finished.
This project was only possible thanks to the tremendous generosity I found in Pernambuco from people like Renato Amram Athias, Méle Dornelas and Diana Moura. The Centro das Mulheres de Cabo de Santo Agostinho deserves acknowledgement as well for all the connections and support they provided.
Since I started this project, Petrobras has come under investigation for corruption, corruption exemplified by the Suape refinery. Brazil’s economy has slowed down significantly, and the country’s political landscape is much more unstable than it was. The stories in this piece are stories you would not likely hear elsewhere. They come from the grassroots and express some of the realities of people who have been living a subsistence lifestyle in the midst of an expanding capitalist project. Please share the link widely.

https://zoe.atavist.com/suape

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Palafitas in Recife

Afogados
A shrimp farm lies next to a polluted stream in the Afogados neighborhood of Recife.
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During my time in Olinda and Recife, I was privileged to meet Andréia Vieira and Fatima Brayner, José Elisio da Costa, “Dançarino,” and his daughter, Alma. All of them helped me gain access to two “palafitas” communities in Recife:  Coelhos and Afogados. These are communities where low-income individuals and families live in stilt houses on the river’s edge, and they are some of the poorest neighborhoods in the city. Water regularly floods these homes when the river rises with high tide, and fire is another threat. But real estate speculation may be the most significant danger facing these areas now as the city expands and developers seek new spaces to build high rises.

 

“Rolezinhos” Fill Brazilian Malls — And Reveal Racial and Class Tensions

Janaína Oliveira, a racial justice activist in Recife, Brazil, tells onlookers at the Rio Mar shopping mall that this "rolezinho" aims to ensure that malls are accessible to people of color.
Janaína Oliveira, a racial justice activist in Recife, Brazil, tells onlookers at the Rio Mar shopping mall that this “rolezinho” aims to ensure that malls are accessible to people of color.

In January, Brazil was filled with news about “rolezinhos,” little outings. Rolezinhos are get-togethers organized on facebook. Primarily, they have offered way for low-income youth, who are also often people of color, to hang out, flirt, and shop in malls. But in early December roughly 6,000 youth came out to a rolezinho in São Paulo, and the event was accompanied by rumors of theft and mass muggings, although only three people were reportedly arrested. This blog post by Rio Gringa, offers an excellent review of the course of events and the debates around the gatherings. Repression by mall administrators and police, including pre-emptive arrests, led Amnesty International to call the response to the rolezinhos discriminatory and racist. Solidarity rolezinhos were planned and held in different parts of Brazil, including Recife. Public Radio International´s The World gave me an opportunity to cover this phenomenon for them, and to talk about the class and racial tensions that the rolezinhos are revealing as Brazil heads into the final months of preparing to host the World Cup.