Tag Archives: Suape

Living in Paradise: a multi-media documentary on Pernambuco’s women fisher folk

Vania Maria de Alcàntara looks up at a mangrove tree as she starts a shellfishing expedition.
Vania Maria de Alcàntara looks up at a mangrove tree as she starts a shellfishing expedition.

I owe a debt of thanks to Allison Mills who suggested I look into the Creativist (now Atavist) platform for this project. Below is a link to the project I put together after my eight months in Brazil exploring the issues affecting women, especially women fisher folk, south of Recife near the Suape Port and Industrial Complex. The idea was to explore the impact that an expanding port and industrial complex (complete with a brand new Petrobras refinery) was having on the women and the environment that sustains their livelihoods. There is much more to say about this and the overall impact, but the link below will take you to the multi-media piece that I have finally finished.
This project was only possible thanks to the tremendous generosity I found in Pernambuco from people like Renato Amram Athias, Méle Dornelas and Diana Moura. The Centro das Mulheres de Cabo de Santo Agostinho deserves acknowledgement as well for all the connections and support they provided.
Since I started this project, Petrobras has come under investigation for corruption, corruption exemplified by the Suape refinery. Brazil’s economy has slowed down significantly, and the country’s political landscape is much more unstable than it was. The stories in this piece are stories you would not likely hear elsewhere. They come from the grassroots and express some of the realities of people who have been living a subsistence lifestyle in the midst of an expanding capitalist project. Please share the link widely.

https://zoe.atavist.com/suape

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Suape’s Children: The Social Impacts of Brazil’s Top-Down Development

After reporting on the BP oil spill and its aftereffects, I became interested in the dynamics of oil production and coastal communities. Suape, a port and industrial complex in Brazil’s northeast gave me an opportunity to do some research into an area with some similarities to coastal Louisiana. What I found is a pattern of development that has received a fair bit of attention in relation to the World Cup:  a top-down model that imposes plans on low-income communities, all too often with violent methods.

Many people helped me over the course of this project. I am particularly indebted to Alex Shankland, my professor at the Institute of Development Studies, who first mentioned the Suape complex to me. Alex also connected me with Renato Athias, who provided extensive contacts and support during my first months in the area.

One result of my efforts is this piece published by Pacific Standard Magazine.

Valeria de Alcantara hunts for crabs on a beach near the Suape port complex.
Valeria de Alcantara hunts for crabs on a beach near the Suape port complex.